In the faculties #2

Theology

University
Eerste slide: Voorpagina met Chapeau en kop

In the faculties #2

Theology

1-1 intro

From Zernike to the city centre, from UMCG to Leeuwarden: the RUG has eleven faculties, but what is it really like to study and work in each one? In the photo feature ‘In the Faculties’, the UK is finding out.
Text and photos by Traci White

Cover photo: A sculpture of Lady Justice holding a sword and scales decorates the main entrance to the modern-day Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies. The faculty has been in the building since 2002, but the property was a courthouse in a previous life and promotion ceremonies are still held in a former courtroom.

2 Meer tekst

Despite a statue of Lady Justice guarding the main entrance to the historic building on the Oude Boteringestraat, the faculty behind the elaborate façade is more focused on spiritual matters than legal ones. The Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies has been housed in their present location – a former courthouse – since 2002, and in some ways, their current quarters feel like a living museum.

In the library, students study between stacks of books about what appears to be every religion on earth and are greeted by bronze, wooden and beaded worship symbols from around the world, provided by former RUG professor Theodoor Pieter van Baaren. Down the stairs from the library, postdocs and PhDs painstakingly analyse handwritten Aramaic characters.

In the classrooms, students are informed about ancient myths, religious movements and the role of gender in religion throughout history. Master’s students get to admire the Rococo architecture of the former courtroom as they defend their research before family and friends. In this building whose décor would not be out of place in a church, scholars make living, breathing, relevant things of all religions, be it Christianity or Soka Gakkai.

4-1

Josephine McHardy, an international relations student, gets comfortable in the library in the theology faculty while doing research on women and war for her thesis framework.

4-2
Students walk through the hallways between classes on Friday morning.
4-3
Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta makes a point during his lecture about ancient mythology.
4-4
A student takes notes as Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta gives a lecture about myths in antiquity on a Friday morning.
4-5
A bronze Hindu figure is one of four on display in a case in the faculty library. The figures are part of a collection from professor Theodoor Pieter van Baaren and are on display between the books in the library.
4-6
Postdoc Drew Longacre (top) consults with PhD candidate Gemma Hayes as she analyses Aramaic characters from the Elephantine Documents.
4-7
Family and friends of master’s students sit together and chat prior to a graduation ceremony.
4-8
Four master’s degree candidates – Anne Nipius, Ingeborg de Jong, Taeke Hoekstra and Enya van der Bij (from left to right) – take their places before their graduation ceremony.
4-9
Holding on to their notes for their remarks, four graduating masters’ students wait for their ceremony to begin in the former courtroom.
4-10
Students head out the main entrance onto the Oude Boteringestraat.
Mobile version
From Zernike to the city centre, from UMCG to Leeuwarden: the RUG has eleven faculties, but what is it really like to study and work in each one? In the photo feature ‘In the Faculties’, the UK is finding out.
Text and photos by Traci White

Despite a statue of Lady Justice guarding the main entrance to the historic building on the Oude Boteringestraat, the faculty behind the elaborate façade is more focused on spiritual matters than legal ones. The Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies has been housed in their present location – a former courthouse – since 2002, and in some ways, their current quarters feel like a living museum.

In the library, students study between stacks of books about what appears to be every religion on earth and are greeted by bronze, wooden and beaded worship symbols from around the world, provided by former RUG professor Theodoor Pieter van Baaren. Down the stairs from the library, postdocs and PhDs painstakingly analyse handwritten Aramaic characters.

In the classrooms, students are informed about ancient myths, religious movements and the role of gender in religion throughout history. Master’s students get to admire the Rococo architecture of the former courtroom as they defend their research before family and friends. In this building whose décor would not be out of place in a church, scholars make living, breathing, relevant things of all religions, be it Christianity or Soka Gakkai.

Josephine McHardy, an international relations student, gets comfortable in the library in the theology faculty while doing research on women and war for her thesis framework.

Students walk through the hallways between classes on Friday morning.

Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta makes a point during his lecture about ancient mythology.

A student takes notes as Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta gives a lecture about myths in antiquity on a Friday morning.

A bronze Hindu figure is one of four on display in a case in the faculty library. The figures are part of a collection from professor Theodoor Pieter van Baaren and are on display between the books in the library.

Postdoc Drew Longacre (top) consults with PhD candidate Gemma Hayes as she analyses Aramaic characters from the Elephantine Documents.

Family and friends of master’s students sit together and chat prior to a graduation ceremony.

Four master’s degree candidates – Anne Nipius, Ingeborg de Jong, Taeke Hoekstra and Enya van der Bij (from left to right) – take their places before their graduation ceremony.

Holding on to their notes for their remarks, four graduating masters’ students wait for their ceremony to begin in the former courtroom.

Students head out the main entrance onto the Oude Boteringestraat.

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